North Carolina’s wind blows strong 

The winds off North Carolina’s coast powered the Wright Brothers’ first flight in 1903, and they’ve been going strong ever since. In fact, just over 100 years after the first flight, converting just a fraction of the winds off our shores to energy could provide all of North Carolina’s energy needs. 

North Carolina moving backwards on energy?

Despite our enormous potential for offshore wind energy, too many in North Carolina’s General Assembly are focused on the energy sources of the past — which pollute the air and water and could threaten our beaches with devastating toxic spills. At the same time, though we have more offshore wind potential than any other Atlantic Coast state, North Carolina is falling behind its neighbors when it comes to developing wind energy.

North Carolina can make history, again

The Wright Brothers’ took a giant leap forward when they took off at Kitty Hawk 108 years ago. North Carolina has an enormous opportunity to do the same with offshore wind, making our state not only “first in flight” but “first in wind.” 

The first step in charting our future in offshore wind is for North Carolina’s leaders to support extending federal tax incentives vital for both onshore and offshore wind power production.

The coal and oil lobby is urging Congress to let these tax credits expire, which would mean the loss of 37,000 jobs along with increased pollution.

That is why Environment North Carolina is calling the state’s leaders to take advantage of North Carolina’s offshore wind potential by supporting extending the wind energy tax credit.  It’s time to make history, again.


Clean energy updates

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Delivering on our promises in the Paris Agreement on climate | Krista Early

As we mark the fifth anniversary of the historic Paris Agreement on climate change this week, our country is promising to cooperate once again on solving this existential challenge for our nation and for the world. President-elect Joe Biden has pledged to rejoin the Paris Agreement as one of his first actions in office. While we cannot make up the time we’ve lost, it’s important to take a broader look at the past four years, because, despite the failure by our executive branch, there has been progress thanks to states across the nation. 

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

New report shows North Carolina leadership through decade of U.S. renewable energy progress

North Carolina ranks 2nd in the nation for growth in solar energy production since 2010, according to a new report by Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center, released today at a virtual press conference. The project, Renewables on the Rise 2020, documents and compares the growth of five key clean energy technologies in each state over the past decade: solar power, wind power, battery storage, energy efficiency and electric vehicles. 

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Renewables on the Rise 2020

Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center will release a new report assessing the growth of five key clean energy technologies over the past decade and how North Carolina ranks in state-by-state comparisons. The report ranks North Carolina’s progress in wind energy, solar energy, electricity energy efficiency programs, electric cars and energy storage. Data will also address national trends and factors driving progress.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Statement: House Democrats release sweeping climate plan

Led by U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor, Democrats on the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis released a comprehensive report Tuesday detailing policies and programs to tackle climate change at the federal level. The report is based on twelve pillars of action with the overall goal of achieving net zero carbon dioxide emissions in the United States by 2050. The focus includes transforming our transportation system, preserving natural resources and public lands, increasing clean energy, and improving clean water infrastructure. 

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