The drinking water for 2.4 million is at stake

From start to finish, the process of fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, would threaten our waters. Toxic chemicals can leak into drinking water. Spills of harmful wastewater can pollute rivers and lakes. The methane gas stirred loose during the drilling process can end up in tap water, causing it to ignite. In North Carolina, the drinking water for at least 2.4 million people, including more than 400,000 well users, is at stake. 

Thousands of acres have already been leased ...

Out-of-state companies have leased thousands of acres to drill in rural Chatham, Moore and Lee Counties, near the Deep River and the Cape Fear River. Some state leaders are suggesting fracking as far west as the Nantahala National Forest—putting precious mountain streams at risk.

... and drilling could begin as early as May 2015

Gov. Pat McCrory and state lawmakers have enacted a new law to allow fracking permits as soon as May 2015. We’re working to build the support we need to stand up to the governor, the gas companies, and leaders in the General Assembly to delay new permits and restore our moratorium on this risky drilling practice. Take action now to keep N.C. frack-free.

Just how risky is fracking?

Check out our fracking expose to learn more about the consequences of fracking across the country.

How we're fighting back

Your financial support gives us the resources to research, lobby and organize more citizen support to win. Your letters, emails and phone calls put pressure on lawmakers to enact a moratorium on fracking in the first place.

By taking action and sending a message to North Carolina decision-makers, we can show them North Carolinians don't want fracking in our state. Together, we can keep our moratorium and protect our drinking water, our rivers and our lakes. 

Issue updates

News Release | Environment North Carolina

Another Meeting, Another Timeline

Raleigh, NC- The Mining and Energy Commission met today to discuss the rules for the controversial drilling practice known as fracking should the technique be allowed in North Carolina. At the meeting, the commission rolled out another new timeline for completing the rules for fracking.

“Our leaders have been trying to fast track fracking in the state since the moment they smelled gas,” said Liz Kazal, field associate with Environment North Carolina. “This is the third time they’ve changed the timeline. They can take a few more months, or a few more years, that still won’t change the fact that fracking still pollutes drinking water and puts our environment at risk.”

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment North Carolina

A Toxic Cocktail: Fracking Chemical Disclosure Laws On Today’s Agenda

As the future of fracking in North Carolina hangs in the balance, the Mining and Energy Commission, the regulatory body that will decide how fracking is regulated should it be allowed in the state, met today to discuss rules on disclosing toxic chemicals that are used in the hydraulic fracturing process.

“The use of toxic, and even cancer- causing, chemicals is just the reality of fracking,” said Liz Kazal, field associate with Environment North Carolina. “Disclosing what toxic chemicals used during the process will not do anything to actually protect the people of North Carolina from chemical exposure; the best way to protect our drinking water is to avoid pumping these toxic chemicals into the ground in the first place. That’s why we support a permanent ban on fracking.”

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Fracking by the Numbers

Over the past decade, the oil and gas industry has fused two technologies—hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling—in a highly polluting effort to unlock oil and gas in underground rock formations across the United States.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Fracking by the Numbers: New Report First to Quantify Threat of Gas Drilling

Raleigh, NC — As Governor McCrory and members of N.C. General Assembly continue pushing to open up North Carolina to hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, a new report by the Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center called “Fracking by the Numbers” highlights the risks to North Carolina if the current moratorium on fracking is lifted.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

N.C. General Assembly Earns a Failing Grade on the Environment

RALEIGH, NC- Nearly two-thirds of the Senate—32 members in total—earned a failing grade this year on standing up for the environment, according to Environment North Carolina’s 2013 legislative scorecard released today.  The grades reflect another year of radical attacks on the state’s air, water and open space protections by N.C. senators.

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