News Release | Environment North Carolina

Statement: Gov. Cooper’s new executive order reaffirms North Carolina’s goals to address climate change

On Friday, Jan 7th, Governor Cooper issued an executive order that works to transition North Carolina toward a clean energy based, more equitable economy. It sets goals for environmental justice, climate, and transportation. 

In a victory for renewable energy, legislation that would have held up North Carolina's transition to clean, electrified buildings has been rejected.

News Release | Environment North Carolina

Statement: Governor Roy Cooper defends local governments rights to choose clean energy

Gov. Roy Cooper announced Thursday that he vetoed HB 220, which would have prevented counties and cities from being able to transition away from antiquated, gas-powered buildings to modern, electric-powered codes.

Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Renewables on the Rise 2021

In 2020, America produced almost four times as much renewable electricity from the sun and the wind as in 2011, according to a new report from Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center and Frontier Group. Renewables on the Rise 2021: The rapid growth of renewables, electric vehicles and other building blocks of a clean energy future finds that if U.S. wind, solar and geothermal power continue to grow at the same 15% annual rate, renewables could meet the nation’s current electricity needs by 2035. 

News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

New report: North Carolina among national leaders in solar power growth and energy efficiency progress

North Carolina ranks 3rd in the nation for growth in solar power generation since 2011  and is tied in tenth position for growth in improvements in electricity efficiency since 2011, according to a new report released today by Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center. Renewables on the Rise 2021: The rapid growth of renewables, electric vehicles and other building blocks of a clean energy future documents the growth of six key clean energy technologies across the U.S. over the past decade: solar power, wind power, battery storage, energy efficiency, electric vehicles and heat pumps.

North Carolina has the potential to meet all of its electricity needs more than 30 times over with wind and solar energy. The state just took a major step toward tapping this potential. 

News Release | Environment North Carolina

Duke Energy-backed bill would lock North Carolina into dirty, dangerous fracked gas for decades

A bill drafted by Duke Energy behind closed doors with legislators was unveiled on Tuesday. The bill would mandate the construction of 3,500 megawatts of new fracked gas plants, locking North Carolina into dirty energy generation for decades. The bill also decreases utility transparency and allows Duke to increase customers’ rates for three consecutive years at a time, requires customers to pay a $50 million subsidy to Duke for a new nuclear reactor permit, and would leave customers paying billions for Duke’s bad investments.

News Release | Environment North Carolina

Statement: Gov. Cooper’s Executive Order will help North Carolina harness wind power blowing off our coast

Gov. Roy Cooper Issued Executive Order 218 Advancing North Carolina’s Economic and Clean Energy Future With Offshore Wind on Wednesday, which commits the state to a goal of 2.8 gigawatts of wind energy by 2030 and 8 gigawatts of offshore wind energy by 2040. 

Report | Environment North Carolina

Electric Buildings

To prevent air and water pollution and avoid the worst impacts of global warming, America must move toward meeting our energy needs with 100% renewable energy. Getting there will require that we get the most out of every bit of energy we use — and that we stop burning fossil fuels in our homes and commercial buildings.

Report | Environment North Carolina

Electric Buildings

To prevent air and water pollution and avoid the worst impacts of global warming, America must move toward meeting our energy needs with 100% renewable energy. Getting there will require that we get the most out of every bit of energy we use — and that we stop burning fossil fuels in our homes and commercial buildings.

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