Updates

Keystone XL approval is wrong direction

By facilitating the transportation of dirty tar sands fuels, Keystone would add 27.4 million metric tons of global warming pollution to our atmosphere per year. President Trump's executive order advancing the Keystone XL pipeline is definitely a step in the wrong direction. READ MORE.

News Release | Environment America

Hurricane Michael coverage: Data, resources and interview opportunities

With Hurricane Michael expected to make landfall Wednesday in western Florida as a major, Category 3 hurricane, then continue through the Southeast, The Public Interest Network (which includes U.S. PIRG, Environment America, Environment Florida, Environment Georgia, Environment North Carolina and Environment Virginia, among other organizations) is sharing information to help your readers and viewers contextualize the major environmental, health and consumer concerns posed by Michael.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

North Carolina's coal ash pits are now more than 'disasters waiting to happen'

A toxic sludge spilling into the Cape Fear River is providing a vivid reproach to the Trump administration's regulation of coal-fired power plants. In a Sept. 21 news report by Bloomberg, Environment North Carolina's Drew Ball connects the Trump administration’s efforts to relax the...

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

At Global Climate Summit, 'Red States Rising' session shows climate action can shine anywhere

Local leaders are taking action to protect our climate, and not just in so-called "blue states." For Environment America’s second event at September's Global Climate Action Summit in California, we hosted state, business and local...

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

From Fresno to Dearborn to Pittsburgh, Americans stand up for clean cars

With the country's Clean Cars standards at stake, Americans turned out to stand up for cleaner air and a more stable climate.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

U.S. Senate holds first hearing on brewing water contamination crisis

They're used in products from non-stick pans to water-resistant clothing—and now these toxic chemicals are showing up in our drinking water.

> Keep Reading

Pages