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News Release | Environment America

Statement: Clean cars rollback will worsen climate crisis

As the unprecedented public health crisis caused by the novel coronavirus worsens, the Trump administration is nevertheless weakening clean car standards that protect our climate, our health and the future of our children and grandchildren. 

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How a new EPA rule could impact North Carolina's drinking water

Recently, the Environmental Protection Agency recently passed a rule that diminished regulations on bodies of water in North Carolina, which produce over half of the state's drinking water. This new rule puts North Carolina's wetlands and water bodies at risk and opens our communities to the risk of contaminated drinking waters and increased flooding. 

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Report Says Triangle Cities Had High Ozone Levels in 2018

Environment North Carolina Reserach and Policy Center released a report called "Trouble in the Air" that describes the air quality for cities in the country in 2018. Durham and Chapel Hill had higher than normal ozone levels for 90 days and that same report shows that Raleigh had 75 such days. 

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Rollback of federal protections could affect NC's drinking water

A federal decision to roll back Clean Water Act protections could affect water quality in central North Carolina – everything from drinking water to algae in lakes. The policy change, signed by heads of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, narrows the types of waterways that qualify for federal protection under the half-century-old law.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Trouble in the Air: North Carolina, Raleigh experienced 75 days of polluted air in 2018

Raleigh, North Carolina with over 1,362,540 people suffered through 75 days of poor air quality due to air pollution in 2018, according to a new report from Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center, Frontier Group and NCPIRG Education Fund. Statistics from 2018 represent the most recent data available. Air pollution increases the risk of premature death, asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts.

“No North Carolinian deserves to breathe one day of bad air---much less 75 days worth, ” said Jamie Lockwood, Climate and Clean Energy Associate with Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center. “Air quality will only get worse as our climate warms, so we have no time to lose. We must make progress toward clean air.”

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