Updates

Blog Post

Will PFAS Burn? | Krista Early

North Carolina has suffered from some of the worst PFAS (polyfluoroalkyl substances) contamination in the country. We’ve seen the effects it has on our communities and on our citizens. The PFAS problem continues to grow. 

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

New legal brief outlines how America’s historic places are at risk from climate change

Environment America, an affiliate of Environment North Carolina, has joined with the National Trust for Historic Preservation to file an amicus brief supporting a challenge to the Affordable Clean Energy Rule, a new set of regulations created by the Trump administration. Unless defeated in court, this plan will sharply increase U.S. greenhouse gas emissions driving global warming, which, among other impacts, will spur a tremendous rise in sea levels.

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Blog Post

Natural Gems | Jamie Lockwood

Spot North Carolina's natural beauty in these Hollywood films. 

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

New Dirty Water Rule puts Cape Fear River and North Carolina’s drinking water at risk

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers have now revoked federal protection for thousands of waterways across North Carolina, as published in the Federal Register. With our ecosystems and drinking water at stake, Environment North Carolina will challenge the Dirty Water Rule in court.

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Blog Post

On the 10th anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon Spill, have we learned from the past? | Drew Ball

The BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico happened 10 years ago and many remember it like it was yesterday. The oil spill killed 11 people and spewed an estimated 210 million gallons of oil and 1.8 million gallons of chemical dispersants into the sea.  Sea turtles and seabirds were covered in thick sludge, struggling just to move and breathe. Fishing communities were sidelined, unable to cast their nets and secure their livelihoods. The tragedy killed hundreds of thousands of sea turtles, marine mammals and birds, and, to this day, left an area of the gulf seafloor twenty times the size of Manhattan polluted.  April 20th, 2020 marks the tenth anniversary and, as we observe this sad occasion, we are forced to ask ourselves: Have we learned from the tragedy? 

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