Gov. Cooper defends local governments' right to choose clean energy

In a victory for renewable energy, legislation that would have held up North Carolina's transition to clean, electrified buildings has been rejected.

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John Stout
Content Creator

Author: John Stout

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Pomona College

John creates content for the Environment America state groups. He was previously the transportation advocate for U.S. PIRG and MASSPIRG. John has co-authored multiple reports and numerous op-eds on transportation issues ranging from increased public transit to electrified vehicles to how e-bikes can help us tackle climate change. John lives in Boston with his wife, who works as a nurse at Boston Children's Hospital. They enjoy biking, surfing and eating.

In a victory for renewable energy, legislation that would have held up North Carolina's transition to clean, electrified buildings has been rejected.

On Dec. 9, Gov. Roy Cooper announced that he vetoed HB 220, a bill that would have taken away communities’ rights to choose to electrify their buildings. If it had become law, the bill would have made transitioning away from antiquated, gas-powered buildings nearly impossible.

“HB 220 would have clipped the wings of our local decision-makers to be a part of the clean energy movement," said Krista Early, Environment North Carolina advocate. "Gov. Cooper’s veto clears the way for us to tap into electric buildings that take advantage of clean energy sources in a way that not only reduces air and water pollution but also prevents the worst impacts of climate change."

More than 25 local governments in North Carolina have already made commitments to transition to 100% clean energy, and electric buildings are critical to making that happen.

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Photo: Environment North Carolina has been working to convince campuses and cities across the state to go 100% renewable. Credit: John Autry

John Stout
Content Creator

Author: John Stout

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Pomona College

John creates content for the Environment America state groups. He was previously the transportation advocate for U.S. PIRG and MASSPIRG. John has co-authored multiple reports and numerous op-eds on transportation issues ranging from increased public transit to electrified vehicles to how e-bikes can help us tackle climate change. John lives in Boston with his wife, who works as a nurse at Boston Children's Hospital. They enjoy biking, surfing and eating.