From Mount Mitchell to Jockey’s Ridge, North Carolina is home to some of the best state parks in the country. Our state parks are where we go to hike, camp, swim and picnic, and we should do everything we can to protect them.

Our best places left vulnerable

Unfortunately, our state parks are falling into disrepair, and are even threatened with closure due to funding cuts. Funding for our state parks has been reduced by 80 percent since 2007, and in 2013 the dedicated revenue stream was eliminated entirely. In 2012, the state considered closing all the state parks for the winter in an effort to save money.

For the first time in history, state leaders are even considering charging entrance fees, which could limit access to our state parks.

That’s why Environment North Carolina is working to show our elected leaders and Gov. Pat McCrory the massive public support for restoring funding to keep our state parks open and protected for all to enjoy.

A 100 year-old legacy

Next year, North Carolina’s state parks will celebrate their 100th birthday. And with more than 14 million visits to our parks every year, we know that the public supports protecting them. Yet, the number of grants awarded to our state parks shrunk from 47 in 2012 to just 14 in 2013.

Year after year, funding for our parks is cut, and if we do nothing, our parks will fall further into disrepair and some may need to close. We can’t stand by and let the funding that maintains our parks and keeps them open dwindle. In order to make that happen, we need people all across the state to speak out in support of our state parks.

Together we can win

We’re knocking on doors across the state, shining a spotlight in the media, and mobilizing local elected officials and small businesses to show support for protecting our parks. But the real key to winning this fight is you.


Preservation updates

News Release | Environment North Carolina

Obama administration drops plans for Atlantic drilling

Raleigh, NC – North Carolina coastal communities won a major victory today, when the Obama administration abandoned its plans to open the southern Atlantic to offshore oil and gas drilling for the first time in decades.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Tourism, marine life highlighted among top reasons North Carolinians love the coast

Raleigh, NC- With Valentine’s Day around the corner, Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center released the Top Ten Reasons why millions of Americans love to visit North Carolina’s coasts each year. The factsheet comes as more and more coastal communities take a stand against offshore drilling off North Carolina’s shores.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Anti-drilling activists show opposition at industry-backed energy forum

Raleigh, NC- Today, advocates and activists in favor of clean beaches voiced their opposition to offshore drilling at the Atlantic Drilling Forum hosted by the Consumer Energy Alliance, a pro-drilling group. This forum comes as the Obama Administration finalizes the second draft of the next 5 year offshore drilling plan.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Outer Banks communities tell feds: Don’t drill off our coast

Kill Devil Hills, NC –Three Outer Banks mayors joined business leaders and more than 600 community members at a public hearing Monday to voice their opposition to drilling off North Carolina’s coast The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), which is responsible for managing offshore energy development in federal waters, organized the hearing in Kill Devil Hills.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Citizens tell BOEM: Offshore drilling poses huge risks to NC coast

Wrightsville Beach, NC – Despite a winter storm, hundreds of North Carolinians attended a public hearing on Tuesday to voice their opposition to the Obama Administration’s plan to open up the entire North Carolina coast to offshore drilling. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), which is responsible for managing offshore energy development in federal waters, organized the hearing.

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