Updates

Alliance Launched To Save Bees

Sixty-five chefs, restaurant owners and other culinary leaders joined us to launch the Bee Friendly Food Alliance. Through the Alliance, chefs and restaurateurs are calling attention to the importance of bees to our food supply, the dramatic die-off of bee populations, and the need to protect our pollinators. LEARN MORE.

News Release | Environment North Carolina

U.S. House Transportation Bill Drives Us Deeper to Oil Dependence

This afternoon, Representative John Mica (R-FL), Chairman of the House of Representatives Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, officially introduced a major transportation reauthorization bill.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Nearly half of all legislators score a “zero” on the environment

Raleigh, NC— A record 55 representatives and 24 senators failed to cast a single contested vote in favor of the environment in 2011, a reflection of the repeated attacks waged by the General Assembly on the state’s air, water, and open spaces last year.  

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

House leaders threaten, but take no action on drilling bill

Raleigh—For the fifth time in a row since Governor Perdue vetoed the controversial energy bill that lays the groundwork for onshore and offshore drilling, House leaders threatened an override--this time in the wee hours of an unrrelated special session--but failed to deliver.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

Obama Announces Landmark Mercury Standards

Raleigh, NC – Today, President Obama and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the first-ever nationwide standard for mercury and air toxics pollution from power plants. A record 907,000 Americans submitted comments on the standard, which is expected to cut toxic mercury pollution from power plants by 91 percent.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

America's Biggest Mercury Polluters

Power plants continue to release large amounts of toxic pollutants, including mercury, into our air. In 2010, two-thirds of all airborne mercury pollution in the United States came from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants. In other words, power plants generate more airborne mercury pollution than all other industrial sources combined.

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