Updates

Protecting N.C. from fracking

We’ve been on the debate’s frontline as oil and gas companies push to drill in the rural Piedmont, near the Deep River. Thanks to support from thousands of our members and supporters, we helped convince Gov. Bev Perdue to veto a dangerous pro-fracking bill — and won enough votes in the Legislature to derail the legislation.

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50 Steps Toward Carbon-Free Transportation

America’s transportation system has emerged as Climate Enemy #1, with cars, trucks and other vehicles now representing the nation’s largest source of carbon pollution, and America producing more transportation carbon pollution per capita than any other major industrialized nation. 

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Report: North Carolina #5 nationwide for solar per capita, but it’s under increasing attack

Raleigh, NC– With roughly 4 solar panels for every 5 people, as of the end of last year North Carolina has more solar power capacity per capita than all but 4 others nationwide. But the Tar Heel State’s solar stature is under increasing attack by Duke Energy and their allies.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Lighting the Way 4

American solar energy is booming. Hundreds of thousands more Americans each year are experiencing the environmental and consumer benefits of clean energy from the sun, often generated right on the rooftops of their homes or places of business.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Smithfield among top water polluters in state, country

Raleigh, NC – Smithfield Foods, which claims to be the world’s largest pork producer, dumps more toxic pollution into state waters than any other agribusiness, and produces the third most animal manure of major companies surveyed nationwide, a new report said today.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Corporate Agribusiness and the Fouling of America’s Waterways

Pollution from agribusiness is responsible for some of America’s most intractable water quality problems – including the “dead zones” in the Chesapeake Bay, the Gulf of Mexico and Lake Erie, and the pollution of countless streams and lakes with nutrients, bacteria, sediment and pesticides. 

Today’s agribusiness practices – from the  concentration of thousands of animals and their waste in small feedlots to the massive planting of chemical-intensive crops such as corn – make water pollution from agribusiness both much more likely and much more dangerous.

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