Updates

Keystone XL approval is wrong direction

By facilitating the transportation of dirty tar sands fuels, Keystone would add 27.4 million metric tons of global warming pollution to our atmosphere per year. President Trump's executive order advancing the Keystone XL pipeline is definitely a step in the wrong direction. READ MORE.

Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Lighting the Way 4

American solar energy is booming. Hundreds of thousands more Americans each year are experiencing the environmental and consumer benefits of clean energy from the sun, often generated right on the rooftops of their homes or places of business.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Smithfield among top water polluters in state, country

Raleigh, NC – Smithfield Foods, which claims to be the world’s largest pork producer, dumps more toxic pollution into state waters than any other agribusiness, and produces the third most animal manure of major companies surveyed nationwide, a new report said today.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Corporate Agribusiness and the Fouling of America’s Waterways

Pollution from agribusiness is responsible for some of America’s most intractable water quality problems – including the “dead zones” in the Chesapeake Bay, the Gulf of Mexico and Lake Erie, and the pollution of countless streams and lakes with nutrients, bacteria, sediment and pesticides. 

Today’s agribusiness practices – from the  concentration of thousands of animals and their waste in small feedlots to the massive planting of chemical-intensive crops such as corn – make water pollution from agribusiness both much more likely and much more dangerous.

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Blog Post

River otter, today’s your special day | Russell Bassett

It’s International River Otter Awareness Day! Here are five reasons we appreciate these amazing creatures.

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Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

A New Way Forward

America has made progress in cutting pollution from cars and trucks over the last decade as a result of improved vehicle fuel economy and slower growth in driving. But eliminating greenhouse gas emissions from our urban transportation systems is going to require more than incremental change – it will require transformation. 

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